ARTSTOR_103_41822003269774.jpgToday we covered the Vision of Tundale, Eugene Thacker's In the Dust of the this Planet, and the "Disputation Between the Body and Worms."

  1. I directed students to the SAMLA [South Atlantic Modern Language Association] call for papers for their "Sustainability and the Humanities" conference. In particular I recommended that they send an abstract to this session: COMPARATIVE LITERATURE (MEDIEVAL AND RENAISSANCE), SESSION II, for the South Atlantic Modern Language Association (SAMLA) annual meeting with the theme "Sustainability and the Humanities" held in Atlanta, Georgia November 7-9, 2014.
    This session investigates the SAMLA theme on "Sustainability" from an interdisciplinary and comparative perspective. How does our understanding of sustainability, ecology, and the environment in early modern literature and culture benefit from a broader, comparative, perspective? How far did early modern writers, humanists, and scholars understand ecological crises and environmental challenges as phenomena that cut across linguistic, cultural, and national boundaries? How far did the rise of European humanism with an increased focus on language and philology alter/enhance/dismiss the concept of nature and sustainability, especially against the backdrop of New World “discoveries”? Which literary genres are particularly sensitive to ecology and sustainability? What is the place of the “national” in a translational preoccupation such as sustainability and ecology? How can the study of early modern environmental topics complicate our understanding of the Humanities? This panel welcomes papers focusing, in particular, on the period ca. 1300-1700. By June 15, 2014, please submit a 250-word abstract, brief bio (including name, contact, and affiliation), and A/V requirements to Katharina N. Piechocki, Harvard University, atkpiechocki@fas.harvard.edu.
    Selected papers will be considered for inclusion in a book project published by Lexington Books’ Ecocritical Theory and Practice series.
  2. I also provided links to some guidance on conference going: here is a good guide on how to write abstracts, how to identify conferences, and how to fund your conference travel and here's one on the expectations for presentations in the humanities; I also forgot to share guidance on the length of the average dissertation.
  3. here's a "storified" Twitter record of a materialism session from the Shakespeare Association of America, to give you a sense of the fun of conferences.
  4. as Summer approaches, we also have a chance to improve our language skills: I recommended Duolingo, while, it seems CUNY may be offering free access to Rosetta Stone (!) [I've confirmed this - but it offers free access only to Level 1]
  5. links
    1. photo series of depressing zoo architecture, where the landscapes painted to satisfy the human viewers. Obviously, this can be critiqued as an example of the fantasy of the wild, but we can turn that same critique back around on the photos themselves, which are obviously framed to make us believe the animals are depressed.
    2. animal architecture, with an example of an Australian Bird with a keen eye for color and arrangement. The bird in this case is trying to attract a mate, but we of course are also delighted by the color. Desire and courtship are working across species lines, then, a point that would work well for papers looking to Chaucer's Parliament.
    3. A Roman-Age mint has been turned up in England, complete with dog prints: here's a bit of the world-without-us, Thacker's third category of world. World-for-us is our world; world-in-itself is the world with humans subtracted; and the world-without-us is the world that's still here with us but somehow impersonally so, as it's not for us. Thacker takes this as horrific (setting up the Haraway vs. Thacker throwndown that would erupt later in our discussion), but we might also just take it as these dog prints and the stone, a whimsical element of surprise crosses into our world without becoming fully ours.
    4. For summer reading, I recommended [[http://www.amazon.com/Oldest-Living-Things-World/dp/022605750X/?&ascsub&tag=gizmodoamzn-20&ascsubtag=[type|link[postId|1566575923[asin|022605750X[authorId|1203060269|this book on the oldest living things]]: here's another example of a World-without-Us, but perhaps without Thacker's horror. The issue of timescale and life of course intersects nicely with our Purgatorial Poetry.
    5. Bad Dogs, here, with the question of nonhuman responsibility. we connected this to a recent article in the NY Times Magazine on chimps suing their owners, which led to the less attractive flip side, which is that a chimp that can sue should also be a chimp that can be sued
    6. Parrots, among other animals, seem to have names: now, whatever else the name is, it's also, as Derrida reminds us often, a promise of death. The name can potentially outlive us, marking the place where we once were. Anyone who reflects on their own name and its use by others must know this. This depressing realization is also a way to overturn Heidegger's distinction between human death and animal "perishing," since the name also 'grants' (some) animals the same extrinsic relation to world that humans have: parrots and humans both, perhaps, are aware that the world will move on without them.
    7. I recommended people enjoy the Middle English Romance Database

After showing images from British Museum MS Add. 37049 and the Getty Tondale, we moved into 3 great presentations and also one sneak-preview of one of my Kzoo papers.

But I'll have to write tomorrow at length about what we talked about: cows in Hell, worms and their character, the peculiar character of the 'tomb verses' in the "Disputation," and the horrific lack of concordance between punishment/reward and the human world. Especially thrilling: imagining how Haraway would handle Thacker's material, or, why does this all have to be so horrific? Why can't we make friends with our worms, anyhow?

"TOMORROW" ARRIVES
Our presentations on Tundale, Thacker, and the "Disputation Between the Body and Worms" covered some of the following:
Tundale and the World-without-us: purgatorial poems tend to feature catalogs, of punishments, of sinners, of places. Here's an abundance that alienates, surely a concretized version of the cosmic horror of Thacker's world-without-us. See also the total lack of correspondence between punishment and sinner: certainly, the punishment has an analogical relationship, but it always seems excessive in relationship to the actual, mortal sin, which is a much smaller thing than eternity. We also considered Satan, the "big bad" here as in Dante, but, as in Dante, also immobilized, fixed at the bottom, and thus a superhuman figure that is, in his way, as trapped as any human. Somehow this is quite the opposite of comforting.

While Thacker concentrates on a set of "weird" literature, his schema can also help unpack the Volsung saga. We have three varieties of Black Metal, with the one simply a heretical, Satanic inversion, the second a mythological pagan multiplicity, and the third something far more inhuman. In the Volsung saga, we see the theological give way immediately to the mythological which then, in turn, gives way to a kind of cosmic pessimism. We also played with the nonrepresentational quality of music, something that Thacker oddly didn't exploit in his discussion of Black Metal (which instead concentrated on the lyrical content). Conversation turned to the way that humanity works, granted from outside as a kind of 'reverse' exorcism, with humanity just as much a possession as its demonic reversal. Finally, we pushed back briefly on Thacker's reading of Inferno, as his typology of demons moves, oddly, and without acknowledgement, backwards through Dante, starting with Satan, then the masses of demons, and then the 'climatic' demons of the lustful.

Finally, on the Disputation, a didactic debate poem, instruction for novices, which swings between horror of death and the promise of wiping the slate clean. We reviewed the cultural history of worms, ranging from the renewable Phoenix and its worm-like larval stage to Christ as worm to the worms of our own bodies, spontaneously generated from flesh we thought our own. Apparently some medieval people wore worms as a cure for the plague. Now, the worms, in this erotic assault, refashion the human body in its own image, by making the soft and shifting body into a hard set of bones, without any vanity or decoration.

Conversation after the presentations turned on Thacker vs. Haraway (whose When Species Meet we had read in part earlier in the semester): what does Haraway's political optimism and feminism do with Thacker's (unmarked) masculine pessimism? What happens if we don't start by assuming that the human has separate boundaries from its "environment," as Thacker does? How does Haraway help us understand what it means -- as in the "Disputation" -- to make "friends" with one's worms, given that this friendship must be temporary (the worms are there only so long as the body has flesh to eat, the body is there only until the resurrection takes its bones, which means the worms will leave first).

And what happens to the "Disputation" if we read this poem in the long tradition of Lady Philosophers disputing with men? Where's the "Lady Philosophy" here?

We returned, at last, to the question of the cow in "Tundale," which its TEAMS editor thinks is just hilarious. But no.

"When he on the brygge was,
The cow wold not forthur pas.
He saw the bestys in the lake
Draw nerre the brygge her pray to take.
That cow had ner fall over that tyde
And Tundale on that todur syde."

We noted the cow's terror, and how the cow just disappears after Tundale's down his penance. Has the cow been punished for having been stolen? Is the cow a demon in the form of a cow? What do we do with the pure terror, unredeemable, of the cow, completely outside the economy of purgatory?